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  1. Why you should care.
  2. Translating a novel: price range? (Money matters)!
  3. Translator Translated by Anita Desai - Read Online.
  4. Wittgenstein (The Routledge Philosophers);
  5. The Knights Von Thrauthemburg (Royalty)?

Falling in Love with a Buddha. Frank Berliner. Rabindranath Tagore. Past-Life in Japan. White Feather. Mahesh Hangal. Little Book Of Happiness. Patrick Whiteside. Prem Rao. The Winner's Body Language. Narayanan Chittoor Namboodiripad. Against Her Will. Mrinal Bose. The Last Romantic. Mimi B.

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World of Little Gods. Bobby Patnaik. Missing My Bejeweled. They may or may not balk. But you need to have a firm idea about the time involved before you start negotiating and possibly hurting your interests in the process.

Finally, biographies are not novels. But the principles regarding rates and negotiation remain the same. Book translations Nov 13, To my knowledge, book translations are rarely - if ever - paid per word. Usually you charge per page, per chapter, or even a flat rate for the entire translation. To my knowledge, book translations are rarely - if ever - paid per word. The resulting amount defines your hourly or flat rate. Not translation, not even bilingual revision, just polishing the English target text of a novel written in German.

There was no haggling when I quoted a four-figure euro total. Quoting per word may seem a little odd to the client if they have some knowledge. But a total for the job can be calculated from that basis. It's being paid adequately for your time that's essential to you; It's being paid adequately for your time that's essential to you; and the total cost is what matters to the client. Regarding the speed Nov 13, I can only speak for myself, and the kind of fiction I translate is certainly not the sort of literature you'll read about in the feuilletons; I'm translating mostly fantasy novels.

But for me this sort of work is indeed faster than translating for example a technical manual, a website or even a computer game with lots of fantasy content. There are two reasons for this: first, I found that using dictation software works particularly well with fiction translations, and therefore I am I can only speak for myself, and the kind of fiction I translate is certainly not the sort of literature you'll read about in the feuilletons; I'm translating mostly fantasy novels.

Anita Desai on Longing and Striving

There are two reasons for this: first, I found that using dictation software works particularly well with fiction translations, and therefore I am no longer limited by my typing speed and cramped fingers. I'm using Dragon and I've not yet figured out how to make use of it with online CAT tools, but for a fiction translation I simply open two Word windows side by side, and then I read on the left and dictate on the right. Second, when I really get into it, I experience a different state of mind, a kind of "flow" where I'm completely immersed in the subject at hand and can write away for hours.

This does only rarely happen when I translate business texts, but often with novels, and makes for a big difference in productivity. To be honest, I never measured this difference and it might be not so big as I think. The fact that I like and enjoy this work so much is also to be considered, it often simply does not feel like work to me.

Maybe I deceive myself here, but I still think it's a substantial difference. You need to work for an adequate price Nov 13, Kay-Viktor Stegemann wrote: I can only speak for myself, and the kind of fiction I translate is certainly not the sort of literature you'll read about in the feuilletons; I'm translating mostly fantasy novels. Kay-Viktor Stegemann wrote: The fact that I like and enjoy this work so much is also to be considered, it often simply does not feel like work to me. Book translation is never a good field for you to make money Nov 13, The publisher takes a lot of risk in publishing a translated book, and the net profit from its sales could turn out to be less than what you have charged for its translation.

That is why most publishers are not willing to accept higher rates. The famous Most Recent Posts. Technical forums. Non-English forums. Country-specific forums.

How do I find a book to translate? - Intralingo

Forums about ProZ. Instead, by inviting everyone to participate in the act of translation, it has created much greater awareness of how very challenging translation is and how elusive and evasive linguistic meaning—not to mention linguistic beauty—can be. Over the last decade or so, literary translation has experienced something of a Renaissance in the English-speaking world, becoming much more widely appreciated and studied. It may well be that Google Translate has played a part in that.

Nevertheless, many people still run phrases through Google Translate and assume that the results are some sort of unvarying, literal, mathematical, algorithmically precise translation. Once my translation of Zama is published, the search engine may locate my painstakingly-crafted interpretation of that first sentence, and present my version to its users as its own probably with one preposition changed just a bit, since the search engine appears to be programmed to evade charges of plagiarism when matches are too exact.

I wonder how long it will take before that happens, or if I'm increasing the chances of it happening by including my translation of the first line in this article. But I'm not too worried about that, actually. In Zama, the taut balance of every sentence creates a rare literary phenomenon: silence. The words that make up the novel thread among vast, resonant silences. And silence is a human thing that no computer can ever be programmed to translate. Subscribers: to set up your digital access click here.

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